Curious Climate
Curious Climate

Our Team

Curious Climate Tasmania was led by Professor Gretta Pecl and Dr Jocelyn Nettlefold with supporting team members from partner organisations around Tasmania

Dr Joce Nettlefold
Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Adjunct senior researcher, University of Tasmania.
Research Areas:
Local news, community engagement, journalism innovation, collaboration, media literacy.
Why I do what I do:
I am interested in working towards improved information eco-systems and collaboration which can help communities solve problems, exploring place-based challenges, sharing knowledge, developing transparency of practice and forming new connections help address complex, real-world problems in Tasmania and beyond.
Professor Gretta Pecl
University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Centre for Marine Socioecology
Research Areas:
Population dynamics and life history of fish, octopus and squid; Impacts of marine climate change; how fisheries, aquaculture and conservation can adapt to climate change; and communication and public engagement on climate change.
Why I do what I do:
I spend quite a lot of time communicating and engaging with the public on climate change as it really upsets me how misrepresented climate change is the media and on social media. Part of my job is assessing all available climate change science for the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, and there is no doubt at all that climate change is real, a result of human activities and very serious.

Meet the rest of our team

Rachel Kelly
University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Centre for Marine Socioecology
Research Areas:
Marine conservation; social licence; citizen science; ocean literacy
Why I do what I do:
I watch how lots of friends and family read the news and live their lives, and see that the environment is not a priority for them - people, in general, are not aware of ocean issues or the extent of climate change globally. I'm doing research on ocean literacy because I want to help to make those knowledge gaps smaller and engage people to take action on ocean and climate issues before it's too late.
David Mossop
University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Redmap
Research Areas:
Marine and freshwater fish ecology, recreational fisheries, impacts of marine climate change, citizen science, science communication and public engagement
Why I do what I do:
Having witnessed and monitored climate-related changes in the environment and I believe research, public engagement and avenues such as citizen science will be critical for us to prepare and adapt for changes ahead.
Coco Cullen-Knox
University of Tasmania, Centre for Marine Socioecology
Research Areas:
My PhD research in environmental communications explores how environmental risks of seafood are negotiated publicly, both locally and transnationally. I am also involved in various other science communication and knowledge brokering initiatives which share the aim of understanding and enhancing the interface between science, policy and public.
Why I do what I do:
With a background in environmental science and a passion for informed communications and decision-making regarding the natural environment, I moved into environmental sociology. By understanding the dynamic relationships in complex matters of natural resource management I hope to facilitate informed communication between a range of different groups.
Aysha Fleming
CSIRO, University of Tasmania
Research Areas:
rural sociology, behaviour change, agriculture
Why I do what I do:
I do research to help change how people think and what they do. People have the power!
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