Curious Climate
Curious Climate

Our Team

Andrew Lenton

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the Centre for Southern Hemisphere Ocean Research & Australian Antarctic Partnership Program, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Research Areas:

(i)quantifying the past, present and future role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle; (ii) exploring and understanding the impact of the carbon cycle and biogeochemical changes on both climate and marine diversity and productivity; and (iii) the potential role of geoengineering in mitigating climate change and ocean acidification.

Why I do what I do:

NOT AVAILABLE

Aysha Fleming

CSIRO, University of Tasmania

Research Areas:

rural sociology, behaviour change, agriculture

Why I do what I do:

I do research to help change how people think and what they do. People have the power!

Chris Sharples

Spatial Science Group, Discipline of Geography and Spatial Sciences, School of Technology, Environments and Design, University of Tasmania

Research Areas:

Geology, coastal geomorphology (focus on coastal landform processes, coastal erosion and physical responses to sea-level rise)

Why I do what I do:

Despite a wealth of evidence that sea-level rise causes coastal erosion and recession, there has been very little research asking whether the erosion we see today is related to sea-level rise or to other causes, and when we can expect sea-level rise to become the dominant driver of coastal landform processes (as is expected). This obvious gap in existing knowledge – and the dearth of research effort on this question, has attracted me as an obvious knowledge gap needing to be investigated.

Clara R. Vives

Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX), Institute for Marine and Antarctic Science (IMAS), University of Tasmania

Research Areas:

Marine biogeochemistry, biological oceanography, climate change

Why I do what I do:

I am a marine biogeochemist and I am interested in understanding how the oceans regulate climate by biological processes. I study phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean and how they are affected by future climate projections. Phytoplankton blooms are regions of intense primary production, where large concentrations of anthropogenic carbon dioxide are transferred from the atmosphere into the oceans. This carbon flux is known as the biological carbon pump, and it is the way by which ocean biology regulates climate. Phytoplankton growth is affected by environmental parameters such as temperature, nutrients, carbon dioxide and light. There are theories of how these factors will change in the future climate; temperatures are expected to rise, anthropogenic carbon dioxide is expected to increase, there will changes in water mixing and stratification which will affect nutrient input and light. Thus, understanding how phytoplankton growth will be affected by these changes is important to help us assess how the carbon flux and uptake will change with in the future climate.

Coco Cullen-Knox

CMS UTAS

Research Areas:

My PhD research in environmental communications explores how environmental risks of seafood are negotiated publicly, both locally and transnationally. I am also involved in various other science communication and knowledge brokering initiatives which share the aim of understanding and enhancing the interface between science, policy and public.

Why I do what I do:

With a background in environmental science and a passion for informed communications and decision-making regarding the natural environment, I moved into environmental sociology. By understanding the dynamic relationships in complex matters of natural resource management I hope to facilitate informed communication between a range of different groups.

David Mossop

University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Redmap

Research Areas:

Marine and freshwater fish ecology, recreational fisheries, impacts of marine climate change, citizen science, science communication and public engagement

Why I do what I do:

Having witnessed and monitored climate-related changes in the environment and I believe research, public engagement and avenues such as citizen science will be critical for us to prepare and adapt for changes ahead.

Emily Ogier

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, and the Centre for Marine Socioecology

Research Areas:

Social and economic dimensions of fishing and aquaculture industries, communities and institutions; Marine governance; Science-policy

Why I do what I do:

I’m interested in how coastal and marine communities, industries and institutions relate to and change with the marine environment.

Gretta Pecl

University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Centre for Marine Socioecology

Research Areas:

population dynamics and life history of fish, octopus and squid; Impacts of marine climate change; how fisheries, aquaculture and conservation can adapt to climate change; and communication and public engagement on climate change.

Why I do what I do:

I spend quite a lot of time communicating and engaging with the public on climate change as it really upsets me how misrepresented climate change is the media and on social media. Part of my job is assessing all available climate change science for the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, and there is no doubt at all that climate change is real, a result of human activities and very serious.

Ingrid van Putten

CSIRO, Centre for Marine Socioecology

Research Areas:

Human behaviour modelling, behavioural economics, fisheries economics

Why I do what I do:

I like to understand how the world works and why people do (or don’t do) the things they do. I’m simply curious. I also hope that by gaining some insights into climate related behaviours I can make a small contribution and keep this planet functioning and turning a bit longer and perhaps make it a better place

Jess Melbourne-Thomas

CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere, Centre for Marine Socioecology

Research Areas:

marine socio-ecological systems; climate change; ecosystem modelling; knowledge exchange & knowledge co-production; transdisciplinary research

Why I do what I do:

I’m concerned about the future of our oceans and our planet, and I care that my kids and future generations can live in healthy, natural environments.

Michael Grose

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Research Areas:

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Why I do what I do:

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Paul Fox-Hughes

Bureau of Meteorology

Research Areas:

Paul Fox-Hughes is seconded into Research and Development Branch, from the Bureau's Tasmanian Regional Office, working on a number of largely fire-related projects. His primary responsiblity is as Science Lead on the externally-funded Fire Predictive Services project. New South Wales Rural Fire Service and the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Council have contracted the Bureau to evaluate the performance of fire spread simulators in Australia. The Fire Predictive Services team are validating the performance of the several simulators and versions of simulators against a set of case studies from around Australia for which there is adequate fire behaviour data available. Paul is also involved in the Bureau Regional Reanalysis, particularly liaising with potential collaborators in funding and applying the reanalysis.

Why I do what I do:

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Peat Leith

University of Tasmania

Research Areas:

Peat has worked for the NSW Government on research for natural resource management (NRM) policy, with the Adaptation Research Network for Marine Biodiversity and Resources (University of Tasmania) on adaptation in fisheries, and with the CSIRO Coastal Collaboration Cluster (University of Tasmania) on improving the linkages between science and decision-making in coastal zone management. He has also worked as a consultant. From 2012-2015 Peat was the Convenor of the Science for Society and Policy Program in TIA. He also led a TIA research project that assisted nine regional NRM organisations across south-eastern Australia to update their strategic plans for climate change.

Why I do what I do:

Peat is passionate about ensuring that public investment on research leads to societal outcomes. His research and practice is geared to improving the design of projects and programs to achieve such outcomes in ways that are equitable, accountable and efficient, especially in areas of natural resource management and sustainability.

Rachel Kelly

University of Tasmania, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Centre for Marine Socioecology

Research Areas:

Marine conservation; social licence; citizen science; ocean literacy

Why I do what I do:

I watch how lots of friends and family read the news and live their lives, and see that the environment is not a priority for them - people, in general, are not aware of ocean issues or the extent of climate change globally. I'm doing research on ocean literacy because I want to help to make those knowledge gaps smaller and engage people to take action on ocean and climate issues before it's too late.

Silvana Bettiol

University of Tasmania, School of Medicine

Research Areas:

Research and evaluation of public and community health that is grounded in a broader social, economic and environmental context. Research interests in complex systems methods and ecological approaches to health, equity and the environment. Current research focused on sustainable healthcare practices.

Why I do what I do:

In public health we recognise that health status of people is impacted by the social, political, economic and environmental determinants of health. Australia is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and by addressing both the causes and impacts of climate change we can bring health improvements, increased action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and realise health co-benefits and build resilient and safe communities that are adapting to the public health impacts of climate change

Stuart Corney

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Research Areas:

Impacts of climate change on Tasmania and exploring the impacts of change on Antarctic and Southern Ocean marine ecosystems. Untangling the interplay between the projected physical changes that anthropogenic climate change is likely to bring and how these changes will flow through to affect people and marine ecosystems.

Why I do what I do:

Basically I love to figure out what is going on around me. My research career started in quantum physics and trying to understand the basic nature of the universe. These days the focus of my work is less obscure, but the desire to understand what is driving the system of study is the same. We are conducting a massive, global experiment that is reshaping our climate and pushing it to a place it has not been for a million years, at a much faster rate than at any time in the history of the Earth. What is the outcome of this experiment for our environment and, just as importantly, for the people, animals and ecosystems that are caught up in it? I want to know, and preferably know while we still have a chance to alter the outcome.
(c) copyright 2020 University of Tasmania.
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