Curious Climate schools
Curious Climate schools

Curious Climate Toolkit


Now you've found out more about climate change, what next? 

These resources help students and teachers think about how to take action on climate change, how to look after yourself and others when thinking about climate change, and what is happening in the international climate negotiations at Glasgow.  
schoolchildren-planting-young-fruit-trees

What can I do?

Ultimately, climate change is a global issue that we need governments, businesses and industries all over the world to work together to address. However, each one of us can make a difference too - by taking individual action, working together to take collective action, and by calling for larger-scale systemic change, for example, by governments and world leaders.

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Feelings about climate change

Feelings can be a signal that something’s wrong and needs our attention. They can also be motivating and can help us identify what things we are passionate about. Our feelings help us learn and guide us about how to take care of ourselves, others and our planet.

Sometimes our feelings can be uncomfortable, and they can become overwhelming. At these times, we need to find ways to bring our feelings back to a healthy balance.

Find out more

Young people looking after one another
Greta Thunberg at the European Parliament

What's being done?

Getting countries all around the world to stop burning fossil fuels and lower their greenhouse emissions will be a huge job, so the United Nations has organised a big, international meeting called the COP26. This stands for the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties and is being held in Glasgow, Scotland in November 2021. 

As well as trying to keep global warming below 1.5C-2C, climate change discussions at the COP26 aim to generate positive environmental changes around the world, including cleaner air, new jobs, and healthier oceans, forests and towns.

Find out more

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